Joint Fire Science Program

The Joint Fire Science Program provides funding for scientific studies associated with wildland fire, fuels, and fire-impacted ecosystems that respond to the emerging needs of land managers, practitioners, and policymakers.

A man holds tools as he collects scientific samples in a burned area.

An employee collects scientific samples in a recently burned area. Photo by U.S. Geological Survey.  


Quick Facts

49: research projects funded in Fiscal Year 2023
$13 million:  amount allocated to this program in Fiscal Year 2023 
1998: year Joint Fire Science program was established by Congress


The Joint Fire Science Program provides funding for scientific studies associated with managing wildland fire, fuels, and fire impacts to ecosystems. Science and data are then used by land managers, practitioners, and policymakers at local, regional, and national levels. This work informs wildland fire policy and practical solutions leading to fire adapted communities and more fire-resilient landscapes. The program was established by Congress in 1998 and is jointly funded by the Department of the Interior and the U.S. Forest Service. 

The Joint Fire Science Program plays a central role in delivering practical, science-based solutions and knowledge exchange by funding and managing the Fire Science Exchange Network. Fifteen regional fire science exchanges provide the most relevant, current wildland fire science information to Federal, Tribal, State, local, and private stakeholders within ecologically similar regions. 

2023 Highlights

In fiscal year 2023, JFSP focused research dollars on key scientific and emerging needs. Topics include the longevity of fuels treatment effectiveness under climate change; fuels treatment effectiveness across landscapes; pre-fire management actions for reducing post-fire hazards; and social and political factors that influence fire suppression and rehabilitation costs.

FY2023 highlights include:

  • Examining the longevity of fuel treatment effectiveness under climate change. Objectives include understanding patterns of fuel accumulation, vegetation change, and potential fire behavior following fuel treatments over time.
  • Studying fuels treatment effectiveness across landscapes. These studies serve learn more about the effectiveness of vegetation treatments and how they help reduce wildfire behavior.
  • Learning more about pre-fire management actions for reducing post-fire hazards. This topic aims to better understand how to successfully plan for possible post-fire issues across multiple jurisdictions. 
  • Assessing the social and political factors that influence fire suppression and rehabilitation costs. 
     

FY22 highlights include:  

  • Over 20,000 individuals participated in Fire Science Exchange Network organized wildland fire science delivery activities.  
  • Activities included hosting virtual conferences and webinars; developing factsheets; short courses and videos; actively disseminating fire science information on social media; and more. 
  • Exchanges delivered over 2,700 events and activities and developed over 8,700 posts on social media channels. The largest participant groups were federal agencies, state government, and the academic community. 

Learn more, apply for funding, or browse ongoing and completed research projects at firescience.gov.

 


 

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