Park Ranger Speaker Series

The Interior Library is proud to present a series of programs on the background and history of sites of interest in the Washington, D.C. region, as well as subjects highlighting the history of the United States. The 45-minute programs, presented by National Park Service Rangers, are held in the Stewart L. Udall Department of the Interior Building.

To register and for more information about our Park Ranger Speaker Series programs, please use our registration form. If you have any questions or concerns, contact the Interior Library by phone at (202) 208-5815.

Additional Park Ranger Speaker Series programs will be posted as they are scheduled. Please check this page regularly for changes or updates.
 


Upcoming Programs

Digging for Henry Bacon
Tuesday, February 20, 2018, 1:00 - 1:45 pm

The Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, is one of the most famous buildings in the world.  However, few can name its architect (or can say, for that matter, where his name appears on the memorial.)  Henry Bacon, the architect, remains something of an enigma. Bacon was largely an unknown outside of the architectural world with few major accomplishments to his name when he was selected in 1912 to design the Lincoln Memorial. In 1924, just two years after the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial – and one year after being awarded the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal - Bacon died suddenly at age 57, cutting short an extraordinarily promising architectural career. In addition, Bacon lacks any kind of published scholarly biographical treatment. The architect of one of the most famous buildings in the world still remains very much a mystery.

Please join Park Ranger Eric Pominville for an excavation into some of the interesting and little known details from the largely forgotten life of Henry Bacon, the award winning architect of the Lincoln Memorial.

This program will be held in the Rachel Carson Room, which is located on the ground level of the Stewart Lee Udall Department of the Interior Building.

 


The African Burial Ground National Monument
Tuesday, March 20, 2018, 1:00 pm - 1:45 pm

The African Burial Ground National Monument was rediscovered in 1991, during the construction of a federal office building in Lower Manhattan. From the mid-1600s to 1794 enslaved Africans buried deceased Africans in 6.6 acres of unappropriated land located within the just outside the northern city limits of colonial New York. At the time, there were more enslaved Africans in New York than in any Southern or Northern city except Charleston, SC. As New York City expanded northward, the Burial Ground was covered with landfill and urban development. The African Burial Ground National Monument is positioned in what is now considered Lower Manhattan including present day City Hall Park.

Please join Michael Frazier; Historian for the African Burial Ground National Monument, Stonewall National Monument & Manhattan Sites; as he tells the story of the enslaved African population of colonial New York. He will explore their financial contributions to the economic development of the city, highlight the negotiations between the Descendant Community of the Burial Ground with General Services Administration to preserve the grounds, and delve into the current scientific DNA research on the Burial Ground’s grave soil samples.

This program will be held in the Rachel Carson Room, which is located on the ground level of the Stewart Lee Udall Department of the Interior Building.