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Montana, Restoration, External News
Invasive mussels
1/21/2017
HELENA, Mont. - Montana officials are searching for ways to fund a proposed two-year plan to combat the spread of invasive mussels in the state's waters.
Oceans, External News
Salmon
1/21/2017
U.S. salmon lovers feeling bad for those overseas infected with a pesky parasite can start worrying about themselves. The Japanese broad tapeworm, aka Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense, is usually only found in fish from Asia's Pacific coasts, CNN reports, but per a study in the CDC's Emerging Infectious Diseases journal, wild salmon netted in Alaska were also plagued by the parasite.
Florida, External News
Invasive mosquito
1/21/2017
MIAMI (AP) — Two more tropical disease-carrying mosquitoes have been found on the U.S. mainland for the first time, caught in traps near Florida's Everglades. The scientists involved say this could raise the risk of mosquito-borne viruses reaching people and birds, but health officials say it's too early to sound an alarm
Idaho, Conservation, External News
Pronghorn die after eating Japanese yew
1/21/2017
Just two weeks ago, a group of eight elk died in the Boise foothills after feeding on Japanese yew plants. This week, a herd of 50 pronghorn antelope have been found dead in the town of Payette, victims of the same toxic shrub.
District of Columbia, Insular Affairs, Conservation, External News
Colette Monroe, Policy Advisor, Office of the Governor, U.S. Virgin Islands; Tricee Limtiaco, Special Assistant to the Governor of Guam; Assistant Secretary for Insular Areas Esther Kia’aina, Dr. Ruth Matagi-Tofiga, Director, American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources; Richard Seman, Secretary, CNMI Department of Lands and Natural Resources
12/16/2016
WASHINGTON, D.C. (December 15, 2016) – Interior Assistant Secretary for Insular Areas Esther Kia’aina today met with Governors’ representatives from the U.S. territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands for the first meeting of the U.S. Territories Invasive Species Coordinating Committee (USTISCC).
District of Columbia, Office of the Secretary, Conservation, Science, External News
Photo of European starling
12/16/2016
Last week, President Obama issued an executive order that directs member agencies of the National Invasive Species Council (NISC) to consider human and wildlife health, climate change, and innovations in science and technology when working on issues relevant to invasive species.
External News
Wildlife Center of Virginia
10/19/2016
Waynesboro, VA - The Journal of Wildlife Management has just published an extensive 11-year study conducted by the Wildlife Center of Virginia which shows that domestic cat attacks are one of the most frequent and most lethal causes of animal admission to this world-renowned wildlife hospital.
External News
Island of Redonda
9/13/2016
Redonda, a Caribbean island that is part of Antigua and Barbuda, was once a brilliant ecosystem. The island is home to a variety of plants and animals including endemic lizards. It’s also an Important Bird Area (IBA), meaning that it supports globally significant seabirds. Due to the presence of invasive species, the once thriving island has been transformed into a barren rock. Invasive goats have heavily grazed the island, decimating the native vegetation and thereby exhausting the very source of food they depend on.
External News
Invasive Aquatics
9/8/2016
The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments (BWM Convention) will enter into force on 8 September 2017, marking a landmark step towards halting the spread of invasive aquatic species, which can cause havoc for local ecosystems, affect biodiversity and lead to substantial economic loss. Under the Convention’s terms, ships will be required to manage their ballast water to remove, render harmless, or avoid the uptake or discharge of aquatic organisms and pathogens within ballast water and sediments
External News
Spotted Lantern Fly
9/6/2016
From the Zika, the mosquito-borne virus recently making headlines across the globe, to Cheatgrass, which increases the danger of wildfire as the plant spreads across the Western U.S. – invasive species come in all shapes and sizes. But the one thing they have in common is the threat they pose. Invasive species are simply that—invasive. They are non-native species whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human and animal health. If left to spread, invasive species can cost billions of dollars to manage and can have devastating consequences on the Nation’s ecosystems, economy, and human health. Invasive species was one of many topics being discussed this week at the World Conservation Congress held for the first time ever in the United States in Honolulu.
External News
Sarah Reichard
8/31/2016
We are saddened to announce that former ISAC member Sarah Reichard passed away while in South Africa, leading a UW Botanic Gardens tour. Professor Reichard joined ISAC in 2000 and served for its first three terms through 2006. In 2011 she became Director of the University of Washington Botanic Gardens. We offer our deepest sympathies and condolences to her friends and families.
External News
Jeffrey Dukes
8/31/2016
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - One-sixth of the Earth's land is highly vulnerable to invasive species, and most countries have a limited capacity to protect their natural resources from non-native animals, plants or microbes, a global analysis shows. Invasive species can spread quickly and dramatically alter landscapes, ecosystems and human health and livelihoods, often with harmful consequences. Notable examples of invasive species in the U.S. include Burmese pythons, West Nile virus, emerald ash borers and tumbleweed.
External News
Yellowstone River
8/30/2016
LIVINGSTON —Montana’s governor on Monday signed an executive order declaring the fish kill on the Yellowstone River earlier this month an emergency, a move that makes available millions of dollars for unemployment benefits and other labor programs.
External News
Wild horse
8/30/2016
A planned roundup of wild horses from the Three Fingers herd in Malheur County, Ore., has been canceled due to a rangeland fire in the area. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management decided to withdraw its decision to gather 100 of the herd’s 200 horses near Jordan Valley, Ore., in late August, forestalling at least temporarily an animal rights group’s lawsuit seeking to block the action.
External News
Department of the Interior Image
8/30/2016
The U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Insular Affairs recently awarded the Department of Planning and Natural Resources’ Division of Fish and Wildlife $10,000 for the development of an invasive species action plan, according to DPNR. The plan will provide guidance to local and federal governments on invasive marine and land-based species affecting the territory. The plan, due to be completed by the end of this year, will be authored by DPNR with contributions from the University of the Virgin Islands, the National Park Service, and other local and federal entities.
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