U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The U.S. Department of the Interior awarded the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service with $167 million to restore and strengthen coastal and inland areas in 14 states, supporting more than 70 projects along the Atlantic Coast. Learn more about featured projects below.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Climate Change, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Press Release
Checking on the new oyster reef living shoreline at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia. Credit: Steve Droter
10/26/2016

In the wake of Sandy’s destruction, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service received $167 million in federal funding to strengthen natural defenses and protect communities and wildlife along the Atlantic Coast from future storms.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Climate Change, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Press Release
Volunteers planting at the site of the Pond Lily Dam in New Haven, CT. Credit: Save the Sound/CT Fund for the Environment
10/26/2016

USFWS Highlighted Projects of 2016

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Science, Press Release
When the opening of a culvert is blocked as a result of damage or debris, it becomes a plug in a stream, making it challenging for fish to swim through, and creating the potential for flooding during intense storm events.
10/20/2015

A collaborative effort supported by federal funding for Hurricane Sandy resilience provides resources for partners across the Northeast to identify and prioritize repairs, upgrades, and replacements to bridges and culverts that threaten human safety and wildlife movement during extreme storms.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Restoration, Press Release
A SHARP student takes measurements of a saltmarsh sparrow - Research specialist Christina Cerino logs morphological data on a captured marsh bird at Barn Island in Stonington, Connecticut.
10/20/2015

A $1.5 million region-wide science project is helping scientists and resource managers understand the effects of Hurricane Sandy on tidal marshes in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Virginia -- and the wildlife they support -- to inform conservation investments and actions.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Restoration, Press Release
The removal of White Rock dam on the lower Pawcatuck River on the border of Stonington, Conn. and Westerly, R.I. is part of a $2.3 million project supported by federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery.
10/20/2015

A $794,000 dam removal project has restored natural river flow in Stonington, Conn. and Westerly, R.I., improving flood control, restoring habitat for fish and wildlife and opening up several dozen miles of  fish passage in the Pawcatuck River for the first time in nearly 250 years.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Restoration, Press Release
New sand is deposited onto badly eroded Kimbles Beach on New Jersey's Delaware Bay, part of the Hurricane Sandy funded beach restoration project.
10/20/2015

A $1.65 million project to restore five beaches along the Delaware Bay in New Jersey improves coastal wildlife habitat and provides enhanced storm protection for nearby residents, as well as public recreational opportunities. 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Restoration, Press Release
Fog Point living shoreline project in Smith Island, Maryland - Matt Whitbeck, project leader
10/20/2015

A $9 million restoration project to construct 20,950 feet of living shoreline protects marshes at Fog Point, a coastal section of Maryland’s Glenn Martin National Wildlife Refuge.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Restoration, Press Release
Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge marsh restoration - dredge work to drain flooded marsh.
10/20/2015

A $38 million marsh restoration project to build storm and sea-level rise resilience into the natural landscape is under way at Delaware’s Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. The project is repairing breached marshes and reconstructing severely damaged shoreline, including critical dune restoration, to sustain wildlife and protect local communities.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Restoration, Press Release
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service contract administrator Mike Durfee observes water-based debris removal at E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge.
10/19/2015

A $13 million debris and tree removal project at E. B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey cleaned up more than 32,000 acres of saltmarsh and coastal habitat at locations near or within the refuge boundaries. Restoration of wildlife habitat will follow the debris removal.