U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey received $43.2 million in Hurricane Sandy supplemental funds for science related to building hurricane-resilient communities, response and rebuilding efforts post-Hurricane Sandy. Visit USGS Hurricane Sandy page to learn more.

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U.S. Geological Survey, Climate Change, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Press Release
Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell helping to measure marsh elevation. Credit: NPS
10/27/2016

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investing $45 million in 28 science and research projects that advance scientific capabilities to improve our Nation’s resilience to coastal change impacts related to storms, climate change and sea-level rise. As outlined in the USGS Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, a comprehensive approach to research on the impacted areas, USGS is improving forecasts and understanding of storm impacts on coastal communities and ecosystems, and designing tools to assist future management and enhance natural resource health.

U.S. Geological Survey, Climate Change, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Press Release
Distribution of the SWaTH network. Credit: NPS
10/26/2016

USGS Highlighted Projects of 2016

U.S. Geological Survey, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Restoration, Press Release
An image of the USGS Coastal Change Hazards Portal on a mobile device. The easy to use Portal provides visitors to the site the ability to track waves and storm surge that can lead to coastal change, and view maps that display an accurate picture of the many coastal hazards posed by an approaching storm. Credit: USGS
10/23/2015

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) models of storm-induced coastal change, combined with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) storm surge and wave forecasts, will be available prior to major hurricane landfall to provide more information about the location and type of extreme coastal erosion that can be expected.

Office of Surface Mining, U.S. Geological Survey, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Press Release
B.J. Reynolds from the St Pete Coastal and Marine Science Center and Jordan Rafael from the NPS set up GPS equipment on an NPS ATV for post-Sandy beach surveys at Fire Island, 2 days after the Hurricane made landfall. Roads were closed in the aftermath of the storm and the NPS brought USGS scientists to the island by boat. (Photo courtesy of USGS)
10/23/2015

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is building on existing knowledge of the coastal barrier island system along the south shore of Long Island, N.Y., which includes Fire Island National Seashore, to fill critical data gaps, monitor and map the morphologic change in response to and after Hurricane Sandy and develop predictive models of response and resilience.

U.S. Geological Survey, Climate Change, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Press Release
USGS SWaTH network and Long Term tidal gage locations from North Carolina to Maine.  Credit: Mark Nardi, USGS
10/23/2015

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) are collaborating to better understand the hydraulics of storm surge and tidal action over marsh land through the Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) Network in two national wildlife refuges in Delaware

U.S. Geological Survey, Hurricane Sandy, Recovery, Restoration, Press Release
U.S. Geological Survey personnel collecting sediment samples near Sandy Hook, New Jersey, part of a study funded through the Department of the Interior by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 to assess potential environmental health impacts after Hurricane Sandy. Credit: Vicki Blazer/USGS
10/22/2015

The U.S. Geological Survey will soon publish an assessment of environmental contaminants that have persisted in sediments, groundwater, fish and mussels several months after Hurricane Sandy and provide ways to improve assessments of environmental contaminants associated with future storms.