Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

In 2013 BOEM received $13.6 million through the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act to address critical needs for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) sand and gravel throughout the Atlantic coastal areas undergoing recovery and rebuilding. Learn more about featured projects below.

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Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Hurricane Sandy, Press Release
BOEM’s Chief of Strategic Resources Renee Orr (left) and curator Nichole Anest (second from right) welcome Core Repository Director Maureen Raymo (right). Credit: Marjorie Weisskohl, BOEM
10/28/2016

BOEM-funded Hurricane Sandy initiative creates a new inventory of potential offshore sediment resources in Federal waters in the Atlantic.

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Climate Change, Hurricane Sandy, Science, Press Release
Restoration at Long Beach Island, NJ, from spring 2016. Credit: USACE
10/26/2016

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) invested $13.6 million in federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery to address critical needs for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) sand throughout areas undergoing recovery, rebuilding and resiliency planning. 

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Hurricane Sandy, Oceans, Recovery, Press Release
Long Beach Island Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project, New Jersey -- BOEM, through a partnership with USACE and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, leased 7 million cubic yards of OCS sand for the Long Beach Island Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project. The project began in May 2015 and is designed to complete the dune and berm system and reduce future storm damage.  Credit: Tim Boyle, USACE
10/22/2015

BOEM’s Hurricane Sandy funding for New Jersey helps identify new offshore sand resources, improve mapping and data quality, restore habitat, reconstruct shoreline, and increase coastal resilience and restoration planning.

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Hurricane Sandy, Oceans, Recovery, Press Release
BOEM authorized 1 million cubic yards of OCS sand to restore 2.3 miles of shoreline in 2013-2014 at NASA’s Wallops Island Flight Facility on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. Photos show erosion after Hurricane Sandy, and the restored beach and dunes that offer protection to the facility. Sand in state waters is a finite resource.  Credit: NASA
10/22/2015

To help states, coastal communities and federal partners meet future sand needs for coastal restoration and infrastructure protection projects, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is sponsoring a $5 million project to identify and assess new potential sand resources offshore from Florida to Maine.

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Hurricane Sandy, Oceans, Recovery, Press Release
Jeffrey​ Waldner, an oceanographer with BOEM’s Marine Minerals Program, right, holds a Real Time Kinematic (RTK) GPS while MA State Geologist Steve Mabee collects a sediment sample from Inkwell Beach, Martha’s Vineyard, Mass. BOEM’s $200,000 cooperative agreement with Massachusetts is supporting the work. Sept. 2014. Credit: Jon Woodruff/UMass Amherst
10/22/2015

Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Maine are among the 13 Atlantic states that signed cooperative agreements with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management in 2014 to help coastal communities recover from Hurricane Sandy and promote resilient coastal systems. The $3 million allocated between the 13 states supports state efforts to update maps and databases on offshore sand resources and coastal geology. 

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Hurricane Sandy, Oceans, Recovery, Press Release
Fisheries biologists involved in the inter-agency Canaveral Shoals fish habitat study tagged 400 fish off Florida’s east coast between since late 2013, with $2.5 million in BOEM funding. A researcher holds a juvenile hammerhead shark in 2014.  Credit: Eric Reyier, NASA
10/22/2015

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management’s support for broad-scale environmental monitoring of sand shoals offshore of Cape Canaveral, in partnership with the University of Florida, the Navy and NASA researchers, will add to the bureau’s understanding of the habitat preferences and importance of the features across a variety of fish species throughout seasons over several consecutive years.