Flowers with purple petals and spiky orange centers bloom in a group.
Only found in cedar glades and cedar barrens -- exceptionally rare habitats known for their shallow soils and limestone bedrock -- the Tennessee purple coneflower was removed from the endangered species list in 2011 after more than 30 years of conservation efforts. Since 1979, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has made huge strides in protecting the species by building fences to protect coneflower colonies from damage by outdoor recreational vehicles, removing competing vegetation, and using prescribed burns at many sites to improve habitat conditions.
Photo by Courtney Celley, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Only found in cedar glades and cedar barrens -- exceptionally rare habitats known for their shallow soils and limestone bedrock -- the Tennessee purple coneflower was removed from the endangered species list in 2011 after more than 30 years of conservation efforts. Since 1979, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has made huge strides in protecting the species by building fences to protect coneflower colonies from damage by outdoor recreational vehicles, removing competing vegetation, and using prescribed burns at many sites to improve habitat conditions.

Trustees Open 30-Day Public Comment Period on Amendment to Final Restoration Plan for July 2002 Oil Spill in Morgan County, Tennessee

Pages