Building a 21st Century Workforce

Index


Introduction

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) is the keeper of our legacy. Since 1849, it has managed and protected our nation's natural resources to benefit all Americans, past, present and future. The Department's vision for a 21st century Interior includes:

  • A highly skilled workforce that reflects the diversity of the nation
  • Optimization of youth engagement throughout department programs
  • Sustainable operations
  • Effective and efficient management

The DOI workforce is passionate about its mission, highly skilled, knowledgeable and dedicated to public service. In order to carry out our vast mission, we need scientists, engineers, park rangers, support personnel and more.

This guide provides an overview of the bureaus and offices that comprise DOI and describes the different opportunities available to you.

Are You:

  • Passionate about protecting America's great outdoors and powering our future?
  • Motivated toward public service?
  • Seeking an environment to use and strengthen your skills and knowledge?
  • Interested in building a career in DOI?

Then explore the opportunities DOI has to offer!

Mission

DOI protects and manages the nation's natural resources and cultural heritage. It provides scientific data and other information about those resources, and it honors its trust responsibilities and special commitments to American Indians, Alaska Natives and affiliated island communities.

Responsibilities

By joining any of its offices and bureaus, you can help DOI achieve the following:

  • Protect our natural and cultural resources.
  • Manage energy, water and other natural resources in a sustainable way.
  • Advance government-to-government relationships with Indian nations and honor our commitments to insular areas.
  • Provide scientific foundations for the decisions we make.
  • Build a 21st century DOI.
  • Educate millions of Americans about our nation's many natural and cultural resources.

For more information, visit www.doi.gov.

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Bureau of Indian Affairs

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) provides services to 1.9 million Americans and manages 55 million acres of surface as well as 57 million acres of subsurface mineral estate held in trust for American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. Established in 1824, it is the oldest bureau in DOI.

Mission

  • Enhance the quality of life and promote economic opportunity for American Indians and Alaska Natives.
  • Protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes and Alaska Natives.

Responsibilities

You can help BIA achieve the following:

  • Fulfill Indian trust responsibilities.
  • Promote self-determination on behalf of 565 Federally recognized Indian tribes.
  • Fund compact contracts to support education, law enforcement and social service programs offered by tribes.
  • Operate 183 elementary and secondary schools, providing educational services to 42,000 students in 23 states.
  • Support 30 tribally controlled community colleges, universities and post-secondary schools.

Jobs Available to You

  • Cultural Resource Specialist
  • Engineer
  • Firefighter
  • Geologist
  • Law Enforcement Officer
  • Range Technician
  • Teacher

For more information, visit www.bia.gov.

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Bureau of Land Management

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) administers over 245 million surface acres and 700 million acres of subsurface mineral estate throughout the nation – mostly in 12 western states, including Alaska. It manages public land resources for various uses, such as energy development, livestock grazing, recreation and timber harvesting. BLM also protects a wide array of natural, cultural and historical resources, many of which are found in its 27 million-acre National Landscape Conservation System.

Mission

  • Sustain the health, productivity and diversity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

Responsibilities

You can help fulfill BLM's multiple-use mission through the following activities:

  • Renewable and conventional energy and mineral development
  • Forestry management
  • Timber and biomass production
  • Wild horse and burro management
  • Domestic livestock grazing
  • Recreation and resource protection at sites of natural, scenic, scientific or historical value (National Landscape Conservation System)

Jobs Available to You

  • Firefighter
  • Forester
  • Hydrologist
  • Law Enforcement Ranger
  • Natural Resource Specialist
  • Range Technician
  • Petroleum Engineer
  • Wildlife Biologist

For more information, visit www.blm.gov.

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Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) manages the exploration and development of the nation's offshore resources. It seeks to appropriately balance economic development, energy independence and environmental protection through oil and gas leases, renewable energy development, as well as environmental reviews and studies.

Mission

  • Manage the development of the nation's offshore resources in an environmentally and economically responsible way.

Responsibilities

You can help BOEM achieve the following:

  • Manage access to the renewable and conventional energy resources of the Outer Continental Shelf.
  • Develop 5-year plans that outline oil and natural gas leasing activity to meet national energy needs.
  • Administer over 7,600 active fluid mineral leases on 41 million acres.
  • Administer leases for offshore renewable energy projects.
  • Conduct scientific studies to predict, assess and manage the impact of the following offshore activities on human, marine and coastal environments:
    • Exploration of energy and marine mineral resources
    • Development of energy and marine mineral resources
    • Production of energy and marine minerals
  • Ensure that any potentially negative impact on marine ecosystems or coastal communities is appropriately considered and mitigated.

Jobs Available to You

  • Biologist
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Geologist
  • Geophysicist
  • Social Scientist

For more information, visit www.boem.gov.

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Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) works to promote safety, protect the environment and conserve offshore resources through vigorous regulatory oversight and enforcement.

Mission

  • Enforce compliance with safety, environmental and conservation regulations on our nation's offshore resources.

Responsibilities

You can help BSEE achieve the following:

  • Develop standards and regulations to enhance operational safety and environmental protection for the exploration and development of offshore oil and natural gas resources on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf.
  • Enforce environmental regulations as part of the newly created Environmental Enforcement Division, a pioneer in the Federal offshore energy regulatory program.
  • Develop standards and guidelines for the offshore operators' Oil Spill Response Plans (OSRPs) through internal and external reviews of the industry.
  • Conduct inspections of drilling rigs and production platforms as part of multi-discipline inspection teams.
  • Review requests and applications for operational permits, such as the Permit to Drill, to ensure they comply with all regulations, including recently implemented requirements for enhanced drilling and workplace safety.
  • Ensure that experienced inspectors are kept current on new technologies and processes and that new inspectors are given the proper foundation to carry out their duties rigorously and effectively.

Jobs Available to You

  • Civil Engineer
  • Offshore Inspectors
  • Petroleum Engineer

For more information, visit www.bsee.gov.

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Bureau of Reclamation

The Bureau of Reclamation manages a variety of programs, initiatives and activities to help the western states meet their water needs and balance the multitude of uses for water. It is the largest wholesale supplier of water in the nation, bringing water to over 31 million people and providing irrigation water for 10 million acres of farmland.

Mission

  • Manage, develop and protect water and related resources in an environmentally and economically responsible manner for the American public.

Responsibilities

You can help the Bureau of Reclamation achieve the following:

  • Manage and develop water supplies in 17 western states while protecting or enhancing conditions for fish, wildlife, land and cultural resources.
  • Manage 476 dams and 348 reservoirs.
  • Deliver water to over 31 million people and to 1 in every 5 western farmers.
  • Fulfill the agency's responsibilities as America's second largest producer of hydroelectric power.
  • Direct the agency's technical expertise in the use of water through initiatives such as conservation, reuse and research.
  • Protect the public and the environment through the adequate maintenance and appropriate operation of Reclamation facilities.

Jobs Available to You

  • Civil Engineer
  • Community Planner
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Engineering Technician
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Natural Resource Specialist
  • Power Plant Operator
  • Program Analyst
  • Wildlife and Fish Biologist

For more information, visit www.usbr.gov.

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National Park Service

The National Park Service (NPS) helps tribes, local governments, businesses, and nonprofit organizations revitalize their communities, preserve local history and celebrate our heritage. It currently safeguards nearly 400 places and shares their stories with over 275 million visitors every year.

Mission

  • Care for special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage.
  • Conserve the scenery as well as the natural and historic objects and wildlife therein, leaving them unimpaired for future generations.

Responsibilities

You can help NPS achieve the following:

  • Maintain a network of 394 natural, cultural and recreational sites in the 49 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam and American Samoa for the benefit of the American people.
  • Protect over 28,000 historical structures and a wide range of museum collections.
  • Manage over 52 million acres of designated wilderness as well as a wide range of cultural and natural landscapes.
  • Provide outdoor recreation to over 285 million annual park visitors.
  • Offer technical support to natural and cultural resource programs, both at the state and local level.
  • Fulfill the responsibilities associated with the National Historical Preservation Act.

Jobs Available to You

  • Archeologist
  • Ecologist
  • Facility Manager
  • Forestry Technician
  • Historian
  • Landscape Architect
  • Law Enforcement/Interpretation
  • Museum Specialist
  • Park Police Officer
  • Park Ranger
  • Wildlife Biologist

For more information, visit www.nps.gov.

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Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) is responsible for protecting the nation and the environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations and for ensuring that the land is restored to beneficial use. It is also charged with reclaiming lands and water that were degraded by mining operations before 1977.

Mission

  • Ensure that coal mines are operated in a manner protecting citizens and the environment and that the land is restored to beneficial use after mining.
  • Mitigate the effects of past mining by aggressively pursuing reclamation of abandoned coal mines.
  • Carry out the requirements of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA).

Responsibilities

You can help OSMRE achieve the following:

  • Protect the environment during coal mining through the following actions:
    • Administering Federal programs
    • Providing grants to states and tribes
    • Conducting oversight activities
  • Ensure the land is reclaimed afterwards.
  • Pursue the reclamation of abandoned coal mines.

Jobs Available to You

  • Accountant
  • Auditor
  • Biology Specialist
  • Civil Engineer
  • Contract Specialist
  • Financial Specialist
  • Geologist
  • Hydrologist
  • Human Resources Specialist
  • Information Technology Specialist
  • Physical Scientist
  • Reclamation Specialist

For more information, visit www.osmre.gov.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is dedicated to the conservation and protection of fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats. It is responsible for implementing some of our nation's most important environmental laws, including the following:

  • Endangered Species Act
  • Lacey Act
  • Migratory Bird Treaty Act
  • Marine Mammal Protection Act
  • North American Wetlands Conservation Act

Mission

  • Work with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife and plant habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Responsibilities

You can help FWS achieve the following:

  • Manage the National Wildlife Refuge System for the benefit of fish and wildlife.
  • Manage fish hatcheries nation-wide and other facilities dedicated to recovering endangered species and restoring the population of native fisheries.
  • Protect and conserve migratory birds, certain marine mammals as well as threatened and endangered species.
  • Host millions of visitors annually at refuges across the nation.
  • Conserve and restore wildlife habitats in multiple wetland management districts.
  • Enforce Federal wildlife laws and regulate international wildlife trade.
  • Help foreign governments conserve wildlife through international conservation efforts.

Jobs Available to You

  • Biologist (various disciplines)
  • Biological Science Technician
  • Criminal Investigator
  • Engineer Equipment Operator
  • Maintenance Worker
  • Park Ranger (Law Enforcement)

For more information, visit www.fws.gov.

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U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is the nation's largest agency dedicated to water, earth, biological science and civilian mapping. It collects, monitors and analyzes data to provide a scientific understanding of the conditions and issues pertaining to our nation's natural resources.

The diversity of USGS's scientific expertise enables it to carry out large-scale multi-disciplinary investigations and provide impartial, timely and relevant scientific information to resources managers, planners and other customers related to:

  • The health of our ecosystems and environment
  • The natural hazards that threaten us
  • The natural resources we rely on
  • The impact of climate and land-use changes

Mission

  • Provide reliable scientific information to accomplish the following goals:
    • Describe and understand the Earth.
    • Minimize the loss of life and property from natural disasters.
    • Manage energy, water, biological and mineral resources.
    • Enhance and protect our quality of life.

Responsibilities

You can help USGS achieve the following:

  • Conduct reliable scientific research in the following fields:
    • Ecosystems
    • Climate and land-use changes
    • Mineral assessments
    • Environmental health
    • Water resources
  • Increase understanding of natural hazards, such as earthquakes, volcanoes and landslides.
  • Conduct research on the potential, production, consumption and environmental effects of oil, gas and alternate sources of energy.
  • Make scientific data readily available to manage natural resources and respond effectively to environmental risks.

Jobs Available to You

  • Biological Science Technician
  • Biologist
  • Cartographer
  • Chemist
  • Ecologist
  • Geographer
  • Geologist
  • Geophysicist
  • Hydrologic Technician
  • Hydrologist
  • Information Technology Manager
  • Natural Resources Manager
  • Physical Scientist

For more information, visit www.usgs.gov.

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Headquarters and Mission Support

DOI protects America's natural resources and heritage, honors our cultures and tribal communities, and supplies the energy to power our future. Serving our nation in the fulfillment of this important mission requires a vast workforce to provide support activities related to acquisitions, budget/finance, human resources management, information technology, policy, facilities and logistics.

Opportunities at the headquarters level exist in the following offices:

  • Office of the Secretary
    • Office of Intergovernmental and External Affairs
    • Office of Communications
    • Congressional and Legislative Affairs
  • Office of the Inspector General
  • Office of Policy Management and Budget
    • Policy and International Affairs
    • Youth, Partnerships and Service
    • Human Capital and Diversity
    • Technology, Information and Business Services
    • Law Enforcement, Security and Emergency Management
    • Office of Natural Resources Revenue
    • Budget, Performance and Acquisition
  • Office of the Solicitor
  • National Business Center
  • Office of the Chief Information Officer

Responsibilities

You can help DOI succeed in the following fields:

  • Aviation management
  • Accounting
  • Acquisition
  • Auditing
  • Budget and finance
  • Human resources
  • Information technology and business services
  • Law enforcement, security, emergency management and investigation
  • Policy development and program management
  • Public affairs
  • Safety
  • Training

Jobs Available to You

  • Accountant
  • Attorney
  • Auditor
  • Budget Analyst
  • Facilities Management (various occupations)
  • Human Resource Specialist
  • Information Technology Specialist
  • Investigator
  • Program Analyst
  • Public Affairs Specialist

For more information, visit www.doi.gov.

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Resume

Employers use the resume for three purposes:

  • Verify the candidates' qualifications.
  • Screen out those that are not qualified for the position.
  • Determine those that are exceptionally qualified for the position.

Your resume is therefore very important, and you must develop it with care to summarize your experience and qualifications. Your resume is the first impression you give to an agency.

Keep the following principles in mind when creating your resume:

Pay Attention to Keywords

Words are powerful. They should communicate your skills and qualifications to the hiring manager. The best way to identify keywords is to review the job announcement. Pay close attention to the following sections:

  • Duties and Qualifications
  • Evaluation

Be Concise

Human resource professionals review hundreds of resumes for each position, so you must sell yourself quickly. Tell your story, but don't write an autobiography. Use concise language that communicates your critical experience and any information that targets the following:

  • Required certifications
  • Education
  • Competencies
  • Skills
  • Knowledge
  • Abilities

Highlight Your Accomplishments

Experience should reflect the type of work you were assigned, your quantifiable accomplishments and the results you achieved. Quantify this information using the following:

  • Numbers
  • Resources managed (including funds)
  • Money saved
  • Time (time managed, time saved, time spent on tasks)

Lose the Acronyms and Abbreviations

Remember that human resources specialists will first view your resume to determine your qualifications. They may not be familiar with military terms, industry jargon and common acronyms in your field. If you must use a professional acronym or abbreviation, such as for a certification, spell out what it means.

Tailor Your Resume to the Position

Writing up one resume and simply forwarding it to every position would put you at a disadvantage, so create different resumes tailored to each occupation for which you plan to compete.

Remember that applying for a job is very much a competition and that your resume is your introduction to the organization. You have to put effort into your job search and set yourself apart!

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Preparing a Resume

Write down the titles of your previous jobs, internships and any community activity as well as the skills they demanded and your achievements within the position. These will comprise the skeleton of your resume.

Your Federal resume should include the following information:

  • Name: Include your first and last names. Your middle name isn't required.
  • Contact Information: Include your address, e-mail and telephone number(s).
  • Career Objective: Write one or two sentences expressing your career objectives regarding the position.
  • Employment History: List the companies for which you have worked or interned and your employment dates. This section is crucial. For a Federal resume, make sure to include the number of hours you worked per week.
  • Responsibilities and Accomplishments: Include your job duties and accomplishments under the company names in your Employment History. The tasks you highlight should match the specialized experience listed in the job announcement. They should also reflect how you applied your skills to achieve results.
  • Awards and Organizations: Include your military service and any professional association to which you belong.
  • Language and Computer Skills: Include every language you know, any program with which you have worked and your level of proficiency.
  • Education: Include your major, minor, type of degree, honors, distinctions and grade point average (GPA). If the job requires specific education, provide a copy of your transcript.

Note: If you are eligible for Veterans preference or for a non-competitive appointment under a special hiring authority, indicate it on the top of your resume just below your name.

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Hiring Authorities

Special Authorities For Veterans

The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) encourages job-seeking Veterans to ask for consideration under as many hiring authorities as they are eligible. If applicable, Veterans should also indicate their preference through the competitive examining process.

By law, Veterans who are disabled or who served on active duty in military campaigns or in specified periods and were discharged under honorable conditions are entitled to get preference in the following circumstances:

  • Hiring from a competitive list of candidates
  • Retention during a workforce reduction

There are three hiring authorities specific to Veterans:

  • Veterans' Recruitment Appointment (VRA): Facilitates the appointment of eligible Veterans with grades up to GS-11 or equivalent.
  • 30% or More Disabled Veterans: Facilitates the appointment of Veterans with a compensable service-connected disability rated 30% or more.
  • Veterans Employment Opportunities Act (VEOA): Allows eligible Veterans to compete for jobs otherwise reserved for status employees.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Veterans can contact DOI by phone at 1-877-227-1969 or by e-mail at VEP_HR@ios.doi.gov.

Schedule A Appointing Authority For Individuals with Disabilities

By removing barriers and increasing employment opportunities, the Schedule A Appointing Authority improves the Federal Government's ability to hire persons with severe physical, psychiatric or intellectual disabilities.

Eligible persons may be appointed to a temporary, time-limited or permanent position. The position of a person appointed under this authority may be noncompetitively converted to a permanent competitive service appointment upon two years of satisfactory service.

To be eligible for Schedule A appointing, candidates must show proof of disability, including appropriate documentation issued by any of the following:

  • Licensed professional certified to practice medicine by the District of Columbia, a state or a U.S. territory
  • Licensed vocational rehabilitation specialist (state or private)
  • Federal agency or agency of the District of Columbia, a state or a U.S. territory that issues disability benefits

If you have a disability and need assistance applying for a job, contact the human resources office listed in the job announcement or your local vocational rehabilitation (voc-rehab) office.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Students and Youths: Employ, Educate and Engage

DOI manages America's backyard. It's our job to make sure that backyard is available for all our youths to enjoy. To this end, the Youth in the Great Outdoors initiative employs, educates and engages young people from all backgrounds so that they can explore, preserve and connect with our nation's natural and cultural heritage.

Through DOI's employment and educational opportunities, youths can have a key role in accomplishing the following:

  • Creating a new energy frontier
  • Tackling climate change issues
  • Empowering Native communities
  • Building trails
  • Enhancing wildlife habitats
  • Restoring our cultural and historic landmarks

For more information, please e-mail us at youthgo@ios.doi.gov.

Together, we can transform the lives of millions of young Americans while preparing the next generation of conservation and community leaders.

USAJOBS

USAJOBS (www.usajobs.gov) is the U.S. Government's official job website. It provides access to the following to help you in your Federal job search:

  • Over 30,000 job listings daily
  • Applications
  • Forms
  • Employment fact sheets

Job postings are updated hourly and made available in a variety of formats to ensure accessibility for those with differing physical and technological capacities. You can search for jobs by location, job category or agency, and you can complete your application online and submit it directly to the agency.

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Find Us Online

For more information, visit DOI at the following addresses:

You can also follow the DOI on the following pages:

You may find the following sites useful as well:

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