AMERICA’S GREAT OUTDOORS: Secretary Salazar Designates Six New National Natural Landmarks



06/15/2011


Contact: Hugh Vickery, DOI (202) 208-6416
Jeffrey Olson, NPS (202) 208-4988


WASHINGTON – Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar today designated six new national natural landmarks in four western states that are home to unique natural treasures including hanging gardens, fossil footprints and rare Palouse prairie.

“One of the major goals of President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors initiative is to develop a conservation ethic for the 21st Century,” Salazar said. “By designating these remarkable sites in Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington as national natural landmarks, we help establish and pass down to future generations those awe-inspiring places that make America truly beautiful.”

The new national natural landmarks are Barfoot Park, Golden Fossil Areas, Hanging Lake, Kahlotus Ridgetop, Round Top Butte, and The Island. Each site has been identified and evaluated through a rigorous process - including a scientific evaluation and public comment period - to formally acknowledge their outstanding and unique biological or geological features.

“This program not only encourages preservation of our nation’s natural heritage but it also enhances our scientific understanding of these unique places,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “Some of the landmarks are the best remaining examples of a type of feature in our nation – sometimes in the world – and we should continue to recognize and study these important natural features.”

There are 591 national natural landmarks with today’s addition of:

Administered by the National Park Service, the National Natural Landmarks Program http://www.nature.nps.gov/nnl/ was established in 1962. It is the only natural areas program of national scope to encourage the preservation of the best remaining examples of the nation’s biological and geological features in both public and private ownership. The federal action of designation imposes no new land use restrictions that were not in effect before the designation.

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