News Header.


Office of Public Affairs

1849 C Street, NW

Washington, DC 20240

202/208 5634  Fax: 202/219 2428

 

 

 

April 11, 2003                                                                                                                                                                              Dick Cole, 703-358-1886

 

Molly Krival

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Volunteer

“Takes Pride in America”

 

Dr. Molly Krival has contributed more than 7,000 volunteer hours over the past 15 years to the J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Sanibel, Fla. The refuge is located on the subtropical barrier island of Sanibel in the Gulf of Mexico and is part of the largest undeveloped mangrove ecosystem in the United States. It is world famous for its spectacular wading bird populations.  At the refuge, Dr. Krival serves as a rover and leads weekly tours to help visitors appreciate the beauty of the refuge.

Dr. Krival volunteers as a mentor to community-based refuge friends groups which seek to strengthen relationships with citizens in local communities and encourages public involvement in refuges.  As part of this effort, Dr. Krival teaches an annual training course on how to work with community-based organizations.

She was named the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Volunteer of the Year in 1998, and received the services Special Commendation for Valuable Service in 1996.  She is also the recipient of the Sanibel, Fla., Golden Spike Award in recognition of outstanding service to the community.

A former professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and administrator of the schools graduate program, Dr. Krival began volunteering with her husband, Art, at the J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge shortly after moving to Florida in 1988.

"This is a special year for the National Wildlife Refuge System, because we are celebrating its centennial anniversary," said Steve Williams, Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "We should all recognize that the

contributions of volunteers like Molly Krival make it possible for us to conserve these wonderful places and provide opportunities for the public to enjoy them."

The only system of federal lands devoted specifically to wildlife, the National Wildlife Refuge System is a network of diverse and strategically located habitats. The system teems with millions of migratory birds, serves as a haven for hundreds of endangered species, and hosts an enormous variety of other plants and animals. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

 

-FWS-