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Mittry Lake Cooperative Management Area



BLM, Collaborative Wildfire Restoration

In desert southwest riparian areas, natural wildfires have greatly increased in the past few years. A contributing factor to the fires is the presence of non-native salt cedar, or tamarisk, trees. Salt cedar trees are considered a hazard fuel because of their density and resinous composition. The Mittry Lake project turned a catastrophic wildfire into an opportunity to achieve environmental stewardship objectives. The Mittry Lake project stabilized native willow, cottonwood, and mesquite tress, other native vegetation, and controlled salt cedar growth in a proactive manner. Their working group brought many people together to tackle this complex and challenging project. Using fire plan guidance, partnering agencies pooled resources to accomplish salt cedar eradication in a streamlined and innovative way. Involving stakeholders and community educators created a culture of environmental stewardship that will be carried into the future.

From left to right: Fran Cherry, Jennifer Green, Jim Hughes, Barbara Raulston, Steven Griles, Thomas Zale, Mike Behrens, Terry Murphy, Carl Rountree, David Repass, Larry Voyles, John Keys
From left to right: Fran Cherry, Jennifer Green, Jim Hughes, Barbara Raulston,
Steven Griles, Thomas Zale, Mike Behrens, Terry Murphy, Carl Rountree,
David Repass, Larry Voyles, John Keys.


Project Point of Contact

David Repass, Project Manager
Yuma Field Office, Yuma, AZ
Bureau of Land Management
Phone: 928-317-3200
Email: david_repass@blm.gov

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