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Wild Fish Through Cooperative Management



Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon

Through the work of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, a partnership of sovereign nations, native populations of spring Chinook salmon and steelhead in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek are being conserved. These salmon are the only remaining wild salmon populations within the 10,000 square mile Deschutes River drainage. Protecting these species sustains a harvestable resource for non-Indian sport and commercial fishers and tribal fishers. Working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the State of Oregon, the Warm Springs Tribes have worked on a variety of projects to monitor salmon life history, including spawning, escapement, egg and juvenile production, harvest, and adult returns for more than 25 years. The Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery operates under a Memorandum of Understanding between FWS and the Warm Springs Tribes.

Spring Chinook returned in record numbers in 2000 and 2001. The dedicated efforts of the Warm Springs Tribes were instrumental in producing this result. Due to this success, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon have come to be recognized throughout the Columbia River Basin as leaders in the conservation and management of salmon and steelhead for the benefit of all tribal and non-tribal interests.