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University of Oklahoma Student Joins Congressional Science Fellow Program


05/13/2013


Ms. Kim Klockow, PhD Candidate in the Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability at the University of Oklahoma (host university for the South Central Climate Science Center), has accepted a 12-month position as a Congressional Science Fellow. The Congressional Science Fellows' program places highly qualified, accomplished scientists within the offices of individual Members of Congress as well as congressional committees for a one-year assignment. Fellows perform in much the same way as regular staff members. The Fellows bring to the Congress new insights, fresh ideas, extensive knowledge, and education in a variety of disciplines. The Fellow may have the opportunity to participate in, and make significant contributions to, public policymaking within Congress on issues such as global change, water, energy, pollution, and communications technologies. The program is administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). There are about 35 Fellows in each class, sponsored by over two dozen different scientific societies. Following orientation and interviews on Capitol Hill in September, Kim will select a position in the House or Senate.

Ms. Klockow’s interests lie at the intersection of nature and society, particularly understanding how people perceive and respond to climate change and natural hazards risks. For her Ph.D. research, Kim is examining the impact of uncertainty information on tornado warning response through both qualitative and quantitative social science methods. Her research combines contemporary behavioral geography, cartography, and spatial cognition into an understanding of the ways people perceive environmental risk in a geospatial context. She plans to graduate in August.