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Northeast CSC News



Grassland Bird Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Meeting


01/22/2014


On Dec 4-5, a group of NE CSC-supported scientists met with managers involved in grassland bird conservation to begin to build a demographic database for a select group of grassland bird species.

Meeting Summary: The purpose of this meeting was to gather collaborators for the NE CSC-funded “Fitting the climate lens to grassland bird conservation: Assessing climate change vulnerability using demographically informed species distribution models” project. The meeting was held in Madison, WI on December 4-5, 2013. In attendance at the meeting was Christine Ribic (co-PI; USGS/UW Madison), Benjamin Zuckerberg (co-PI; USGS/UW Madison), Lisa McCauley (project postdoc; UW Madison), James Ellis (IL Natural History Survey, Prairie TAG Coordinator for ETPBR LCC), Scott Hull (WI DNR), David King (US Forest Service), Katie Koch (participating remotely; US FWS), Melinda Knutson (US FWS), David Lorenz (UW-Madison), Lars Pomera (UW Madison), Rosalind Renfrew (Vermont Center for Ecostudies), David Rugg (US Forest Service), David Sample (WI DNR), Susan Skagen (USGS), Gwen White (ETPBR LCC Science Coordinator), Tom Will (US FWS).

Goals for this meeting included: (1) establishing relationships among collaborators and project leaders; (2) remind collaborators of the project objectives/goals; (3) select and prioritize model species; (4) discuss climate sensitivities of grassland birds; (5) gather information about demographic data for grassland birds to begin building the demographic database; and (6) discuss current grassland bird projects and management and how this project can inform those projects.