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Science at the Alaska CSC




In This Section:

2010-2011 Annual Report
 
2011-2012 Annual Report
 
2012-2013 Annual Report
 
Recent Publications
 
Research Direction
 
Science Implementation

Priority science activities of CSCs include:

  • Use and creation of high-resolution climate models and derivative products to help forecast ecological and population responses at national, regional, and local scales
  • Integration of physical climate models with ecological, habitat, and population response models
  • Development of methods to assess vulnerability of species, habitats, and human communities
  • Development of standardized approaches to modeling, monitoring, data management and decision support 

The research direction taken by the Alaska CSC is guided by the Center's science agenda or Strategic Plan. This document establishes a set of core priorities or mission areas for the Alaska CSC and helps ensure that the Center's scientific program addresses key management needs. The Alaska CSC's Strategic Plan was completed in October 2011. 

The development of this Strategic Plan was guided by the Alaska Climate Change Executive Roundtable (ACCER), a group comprised of senior-level executives from federal and non-federal agencies that addresses natural and cultural resource issues. With the help of its Climate Change Coordinating Committee (C4), ACCER also directs the annual implementation of this agenda. The C4, Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, USGS Alaska Science Center, and various Federal agencies assist with independent scientific review of the Alaska CSC's program activities. 

Highlights of activities and accomplishments at the AK CSC can be found in the AK CSC Annual Reports for 2010-20112011-2012, and 2012-2013 (new!).

projects button AK CSC Projects

Regional Climate Change Challenges:
  • Biological Carbon Sequestration
  • Coastal Erosion
  • Ecosystem Restoration
  • Fish and Wildlife Response to Climate Change
  • Food Web Impacts
  • Forest Resilience
  • Health of Indigenous Peoples
  • Invasive Marine and Terrestrial Species
  • Marine Ecosystem Resilience
  • Permafrost Degradation
  • Protection of Marine and Freshwater Migratory Fish Species
  • Protection of Native American Cultural Resources
  • Protection of Trust Species
  • Sea-ice and Glacier Change
  • Sea-level Rise
  • Water Availability and Water Quality
  • Wildlife Disease
  • Wildfire

 

 

Alaska Climate Science Center Photos


January 19, 2012

These images are examples of some of the climate change challenges faced in the Alaska Climate Science Center region.


  • Andrew Schroth filtering river water samples from the Copper River watershed, Alaska for analysis of metals at trace level concentration. Photo by Scott Linton, Dartmouth College. USGS
    Andrew Schroth filtering river water samples from the Copper River watershed, Alaska for analysis of metals at trace level concentration. Photo by Scott Linton, Dartmouth College.
  • Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center. USGS student volunteer, Scott Linton of Dartmouth College, measuring the pH and conductivity of the glacial Kuskulana River near Chitina, Alaska.
    USGS student volunteer, Scott Linton of Dartmouth College, measuring the pH and conductivity of the glacial Kuskulana River near Chitina, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center.
  • Surface waters draining low-elevation swamps mix with a river draining a proglacial lake near Cordova, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center.
    Surface waters draining low-elevation swamps mix with a river draining a proglacial lake near Cordova, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center.
  • The Copper River flows past Child's Glacier directly downstream of Million Dollar Bridge near Cordova, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center.
    The Copper River flows past Child's Glacier directly downstream of Million Dollar Bridge near Cordova, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center.
  • Image of a dust plume from November, 2006, showing iron-bearing dust being transported several hundred km into the Gulf of Alaska. Image created by Myrna Gatica (CUNY) as part of her 2009 PEP summer internship in Woods Hole ( http://www.woodsholediversity.org/pep/ ) .  The true-color image was created from the raw MODIS satellite data using hdflook, available at: ( http://www-loa.univ-lille1.fr/Hdflook/hdflook_gb.html ). hdflook
    . Image of a dust plume from November, 2006, showing iron-bearing dust being transported several hundred km into the Gulf of Alaska. Image created by Myrna Gatica (CUNY) as part of her 2009 PEP summer internship in Woods Hole ( http://www.woodsholediversity.org/pep/ ) .  The true-color image was created from the raw MODIS satellite data using hdflook, available at: ( http://www-loa.univ-lille1.fr/Hdflook/hdflook_gb.html ).
  • View of exposed sediment on the Copper River floodplain near Cordova, AK, during October, 2009.  This exposed sediment contributes to the dust plumes that can transport iron far offshore. Photo by John Crusius, Woods Hole Science Center
    View of exposed sediment on the Copper River floodplain near Cordova, AK, during October, 2009.  This exposed sediment contributes to the dust plumes that can transport iron far offshore.    (CopperRiverFloodplain, photo by John Crusius, Woods Hole Science Center)
  • USGS scientists measuring snowpack and glacier characteristics.  [Location uncertain but can be determined if needed]  Monitoring and research has already documented that climate change is affecting glaciers, and USGS scientists are now working to develop models and forecasts of how changes in glaciers will affect water supplies (quality and quantity), hazard risks, and freshwater and marine ecosystems. Photo by USGS.
    USGS scientists measuring snowpack and glacier characteristics.  [Location uncertain but can be determined if needed]  Monitoring and research has already documented that climate change is affecting glaciers, and USGS scientists are now working to develop models and forecasts of how changes in glaciers will affect water supplies (quality and quantity), hazard risks, and freshwater and marine ecosystems. Photo by USGS.
  • USGS scientists take measurements of a glacier in Alaska.  Monitoring and research has already documented that many glaciers are melting and receding, and USGS scientists are working to understand the mechanics of glacier behavior and to develop models of how changes in glaciers will affect water supplies (quality and quantity), hazard risks, and freshwater and marine ecosystems. Photo by USGS.
    USGS scientists take measurements of a glacier in Alaska.  Monitoring and research has already documented that many glaciers are melting and receding, and USGS scientists are working to understand the mechanics of glacier behavior and to develop models of how changes in glaciers will affect water supplies (quality and quantity), hazard risks, and freshwater and marine ecosystems. Photo by USGS.
  • USGS studies of polar bear ecology and their use of sea ice have been instrumental in understanding how climate change may affect the polar bear populations in the future.  The studies have also set the stage for assessing other ice-dependent species as well.  Photo by USGS.
    USGS studies of polar bear ecology and their use of sea ice have been instrumental in understanding how climate change may affect the polar bear populations in the future.  The studies have also set the stage for assessing other ice-dependent species as well.  Photo by USGS.
  • Matanuska Glacier, Alaska. Photo credit: Dean Gesch, USGS.
    Matanuska Glacier, Alaska.
  • Panoramic (180 degree) view of landscape in Denali National Park, Alaska. Photographed on July 27, 2009, during fieldwork on Dall sheep habitat by members of the USGS Southwest Geographic Science Team. Photo credit: Dennis Dye, USGS.
    Panoramic (~180 degree) view of landscape in Denali National Park, Alaska. Photographed on July 27, 2009, during fieldwork on Dall sheep habitat by members of the USGS Southwest Geographic Science Team.
  • Andrew Schroth filtering river water samples from the Copper River watershed, Alaska for analysis of metals at trace level concentration. Photo by Scott Linton, Dartmouth College.
  • USGS student volunteer, Scott Linton of Dartmouth College, measuring the pH and conductivity of the glacial Kuskulana River near Chitina, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center.
  • Surface waters draining low-elevation swamps mix with a river draining a proglacial lake near Cordova, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center.
  • The Copper River flows past Child's Glacier directly downstream of Million Dollar Bridge near Cordova, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Schroth, Woods Hole Science Center.
  • . Image of a dust plume from November, 2006, showing iron-bearing dust being transported several hundred km into the Gulf of Alaska. Image created by Myrna Gatica (CUNY) as part of her 2009 PEP summer internship in Woods Hole ( http://www.woodsholediversity.org/pep/ ) .  The true-color image was created from the raw MODIS satellite data using hdflook, available at: ( http://www-loa.univ-lille1.fr/Hdflook/hdflook_gb.html ).
  • View of exposed sediment on the Copper River floodplain near Cordova, AK, during October, 2009.  This exposed sediment contributes to the dust plumes that can transport iron far offshore.    (CopperRiverFloodplain, photo by John Crusius, Woods Hole Science Center)
  • USGS scientists measuring snowpack and glacier characteristics.  [Location uncertain but can be determined if needed]  Monitoring and research has already documented that climate change is affecting glaciers, and USGS scientists are now working to develop models and forecasts of how changes in glaciers will affect water supplies (quality and quantity), hazard risks, and freshwater and marine ecosystems. Photo by USGS.
  • USGS scientists take measurements of a glacier in Alaska.  Monitoring and research has already documented that many glaciers are melting and receding, and USGS scientists are working to understand the mechanics of glacier behavior and to develop models of how changes in glaciers will affect water supplies (quality and quantity), hazard risks, and freshwater and marine ecosystems. Photo by USGS.
  • USGS studies of polar bear ecology and their use of sea ice have been instrumental in understanding how climate change may affect the polar bear populations in the future.  The studies have also set the stage for assessing other ice-dependent species as well.  Photo by USGS.
  • Matanuska Glacier, Alaska.
  • Panoramic (~180 degree) view of landscape in Denali National Park, Alaska. Photographed on July 27, 2009, during fieldwork on Dall sheep habitat by members of the USGS Southwest Geographic Science Team.